thermostatThat’s what some researchers from the London University College in England are telling us.

According to a recent study published in Obesity Reviews, staying indoors all winter long and turning up the heat to stay warm could be contributing to today’s obesity epidemic.

British researchers believe that staying indoors to avoid the cold alters our body’s ability to generate heat, and therefore, burn less calories.

Lead researcher, Fiona Johnson, gathered evidence supporting the theory that higher indoor temperatures and less exposure to the cold is contributing to rising obesity.

The study is not conclusive, but Johnson did state “that increases in indoor temperatures could be having a significant effect on body weight.”

Of course, Johnson also believes that warmer homes are not a major contributor to the obesity problem, but typical explanations regarding diet and exercise do not provide a complete answer to this issue.

Johnson and her associates documented an increase in the heating of homes in both the United States and the United Kingdom over a span of the last few decades.

This could indicate that people are spending less time outdoors in cold weather commuting, working, or even playing. The researchers noted that as a result, they are probably not exposed to cold as much as they used to be.

Spending less time in the cold affects how our bodies burn calories in two ways.

The first effect is that our bodies use less energy in just trying to maintain our normal body temperature.

“As the temperature goes down below 27 degrees Celsius (80.6 Fahrenheit), energy expenditure increases,” Johnson told Discovery News. “That’s simply the expenditure of the body staying warm.”

Second, our body’s ability to generate internal heat is greatly reduced.

Internal heat is produced by our bodies from stored brown fat. Brown fat is different from white fat, which is simply stored calories. Brown fat burns calories to create the heat that raises your body temperature. According to Johson, studies have also shown that overweight people tend to have less brown fat than thin people.

If saving the planet hasn’t been enough motivation to get you to turn down the heat, then maybe shedding some weight might do the trick.

However, if you still insist on staying indoors this winter, there are some others things you should consider.

Doctors have also found that there are extra stressors on your body during the winter that could be alleviated by exercising.

So, if you must stay indoors, then start or continue a workout routine.

Regular exercise has been shown to boost the immune system, so your body is better prepared to fight the seasonal flu and colds.

Another common ailment for a lot of people during the winter is seasonal depression, and exercise has also been shown to provide some relief from it.

adminWeight Lossindoors,obesity reviews,Weight Loss,winterThat's what some researchers from the London University College in England are telling us. According to a recent study published in Obesity Reviews, staying indoors all winter long and turning up the heat to stay warm could be contributing to today's obesity epidemic. British researchers believe that staying indoors to avoid...We Do The Research... You Do The Shopping!